ALERTS

Annexation Public Hearing - August 14, 2018

Board of Aldermen Public Hearing on Annexation Proposal.  7:00 PM at City Hall. [more...]

Precautionary Boil Order - July 14, 2018

**Attention: Precautionary Boil Water Advisory for Archie, Missouri** Saturday, Jul 14, 2018  ... [more...]

Kenneth Massa appointed Archie New Police Chief - July 05, 2018

Kenneth Massa has been appointed to replace Brian Koehn as Archie Police Chief as of June 29th, 2... [more...]

Yard Waste Collection - March 20, 2018

Beginning April 1st, Municipal Waste Services will have one trash truck in Archie on the first p... [more...]

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Alerts

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Annexation Public Hearing

August 14, 2018

Board of Aldermen Public Hearing on Annexation Proposal.  7:00 PM at City Hall.

Precautionary Boil Order

July 14, 2018

**Attention: Precautionary Boil Water Advisory for Archie, Missouri**

Saturday, Jul 14, 2018

 

Due to a loss of water pressure in the City of Archie water system this afternoon, a precautionary boil water advisory has been issued.  The boil water advisory has been issued to customers of the system because there is concern that a problem with drinking water may exist, but it has not yet been confirmed.

The advisory will stay in effect while the City awaits the results of confirmation samples collected for bacteriological analysis. This may take up to two days plus the time required to transport samples to the laboratory.

What precautions should I take if under a boil water order or advisory?

 

The following steps need to be taken:

Boil water vigorously for three minutes prior to use. Use only water that has been boiled for drinking, diluting fruit juices, all other food preparation and brushing teeth.

Dispose of ice cubes and do not use ice from a household automatic ice maker. Remake ice cubes with water that has been boiled.

Disinfect dishes and other food contact surfaces by immersion for at least one minute in clean tap water that contains one teaspoon of unscented household bleach per gallon of water.

Note: Let water cool sufficiently before drinking (approximately 110 degrees F).

Do I need to boil bath water?

Water used for bathing does not generally need to be boiled. Supervision of children is necessary while bathing or using backyard pools so water is not ingested. Persons with cuts or severe rashes may wish to consult their physicians.

 

 

What are the symptoms of water-borne illness?

Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea and possible jaundice and associated headaches and fatigue. These symptoms, however, are not just associated with disease-causing organisms in drinking water; they also may be caused by a number of factors other than your drinking water.

Are some groups of people more seriously affected?

Persons with reduced immune function, infants under six months in age, and the elderly are more seriously impacted by water-borne disease. Immune function may be reduced due to chemotherapy for treatment, organ transplants or diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Persons in these groups need to contact their personal physicians for additional information.

Should I buy bottled water just to be on the safe side?

Buying bottled water may be a feasible alternative to boiling drinking water when under a boil water order. Bottled water operations are routinely inspected, and samples are analyzed by state health agencies. This offers a safe source of water for drinking, cooking and brushing teeth.

Where can I get more information?

To learn more about your drinking water, contact the department at 800-361-4827 or the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water hotline at 800-426-4791 if you are served by a public water system. If you get your drinking water from a private well, contact the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at 800-392-0272.

 

 

 

**Attention: Precautionary Boil Water Advisory for Archie, Missouri**

Saturday, Jul 14, 2018

 

Due to a loss of water pressure in the City of Archie water system this afternoon, a precautionary boil water advisory has been issued.  The boil water advisory has been issued to customers of the system because there is concern that a problem with drinking water may exist, but it has not yet been confirmed.

The advisory will stay in effect while the City awaits the results of confirmation samples collected for bacteriological analysis. This may take up to two days plus the time required to transport samples to the laboratory.

What precautions should I take if under a boil water order or advisory?

 

The following steps need to be taken:

Boil water vigorously for three minutes prior to use. Use only water that has been boiled for drinking, diluting fruit juices, all other food preparation and brushing teeth.

Dispose of ice cubes and do not use ice from a household automatic ice maker. Remake ice cubes with water that has been boiled.

Disinfect dishes and other food contact surfaces by immersion for at least one minute in clean tap water that contains one teaspoon of unscented household bleach per gallon of water.

Note: Let water cool sufficiently before drinking (approximately 110 degrees F).

Do I need to boil bath water?

Water used for bathing does not generally need to be boiled. Supervision of children is necessary while bathing or using backyard pools so water is not ingested. Persons with cuts or severe rashes may wish to consult their physicians.

 

 

What are the symptoms of water-borne illness?

Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea and possible jaundice and associated headaches and fatigue. These symptoms, however, are not just associated with disease-causing organisms in drinking water; they also may be caused by a number of factors other than your drinking water.

Are some groups of people more seriously affected?

Persons with reduced immune function, infants under six months in age, and the elderly are more seriously impacted by water-borne disease. Immune function may be reduced due to chemotherapy for treatment, organ transplants or diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Persons in these groups need to contact their personal physicians for additional information.

Should I buy bottled water just to be on the safe side?

Buying bottled water may be a feasible alternative to boiling drinking water when under a boil water order. Bottled water operations are routinely inspected, and samples are analyzed by state health agencies. This offers a safe source of water for drinking, cooking and brushing teeth.

Where can I get more information?

To learn more about your drinking water, contact the department at 800-361-4827 or the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water hotline at 800-426-4791 if you are served by a public water system. If you get your drinking water from a private well, contact the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at 800-392-0272.

 

 

 

**Attention: Precautionary Boil Water Advisory for Archie, Missouri**

Saturday, Jul 14, 2018

 

Due to a loss of water pressure in the City of Archie water system this afternoon, a precautionary boil water advisory has been issued.  The boil water advisory has been issued to customers of the system because there is concern that a problem with drinking water may exist, but it has not yet been confirmed.

The advisory will stay in effect while the City awaits the results of confirmation samples collected for bacteriological analysis. This may take up to two days plus the time required to transport samples to the laboratory.

What precautions should I take if under a boil water order or advisory?

 

The following steps need to be taken:

Boil water vigorously for three minutes prior to use. Use only water that has been boiled for drinking, diluting fruit juices, all other food preparation and brushing teeth.

Dispose of ice cubes and do not use ice from a household automatic ice maker. Remake ice cubes with water that has been boiled.

Disinfect dishes and other food contact surfaces by immersion for at least one minute in clean tap water that contains one teaspoon of unscented household bleach per gallon of water.

Note: Let water cool sufficiently before drinking (approximately 110 degrees F).

Do I need to boil bath water?

Water used for bathing does not generally need to be boiled. Supervision of children is necessary while bathing or using backyard pools so water is not ingested. Persons with cuts or severe rashes may wish to consult their physicians.

 

 

What are the symptoms of water-borne illness?

Disease symptoms may include diarrhea, cramps, nausea and possible jaundice and associated headaches and fatigue. These symptoms, however, are not just associated with disease-causing organisms in drinking water; they also may be caused by a number of factors other than your drinking water.

Are some groups of people more seriously affected?

Persons with reduced immune function, infants under six months in age, and the elderly are more seriously impacted by water-borne disease. Immune function may be reduced due to chemotherapy for treatment, organ transplants or diseases such as HIV/AIDS. Persons in these groups need to contact their personal physicians for additional information.

Should I buy bottled water just to be on the safe side?

Buying bottled water may be a feasible alternative to boiling drinking water when under a boil water order. Bottled water operations are routinely inspected, and samples are analyzed by state health agencies. This offers a safe source of water for drinking, cooking and brushing teeth.

Where can I get more information?

To learn more about your drinking water, contact the department at 800-361-4827 or the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water hotline at 800-426-4791 if you are served by a public water system. If you get your drinking water from a private well, contact the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services at 800-392-0272.

 

 

 

 

Kenneth Massa appointed Archie New Police Chief

July 05, 2018

Kenneth Massa has been appointed to replace Brian Koehn as Archie Police Chief as of June 29th, 2018.

Yard Waste Collection

March 20, 2018

Beginning April 1st, Municipal Waste Services will have one trash truck in Archie on the first pickup of every month to collect yard waste.

Yard Waste needs to be in PAPER BAGS or in a trash container that can be dumped.

If there are limbs, they will need to be bundled in 4 foot lengths and not over 18 inches in diameter.

This run will be made from April 1st thru November 30th each year on the first collection day of each month.

There will be no extra charge for this service